Starter for 10: Meet Jonna Iljin, Nordcloud’s Head of Design

When people start working with Nordcloud, they generally comment on 2 things. First, how friendly and knowledgeable everyone is. Second, how fast Nordcloud is growing.

This blog series gives you insight into both those elements – the great people and the supercharged growth. In this article, we talk to Jonna Iljin, our new Head of Design, about her first impressions as a Nordcloudian and the cloud-native future.

Q1: First impressions, Jonna: what struck you about your first week at Nordcloud?

If I go back in time and think back to the interviews with different people, what I loved was the dynamic atmosphere and the energy that the people had. There is a very open and informal way of talking and sharing which gave me the confidence in joining.

I was surprised by how easy it has been to reach out to people, and how friendly everyone is. Having all this energy and growth around me has been very welcoming.

Q2: What made you decide to join Nordcloud?

I would say, in simple terms, there were two main ingredients;

The first is the energy of the people, and the second is that, as a team, we are able to impact where we are going from a design angle.

We don’t really know what the finishing line looks like and it is inspiring to be part of this growth journey and to be involved in shaping how design is utilised and harnessed in this context. 

For some designers, coming into a complex tech company might be perceived as challenging, but for me I see huge potential. Technology is driving a lot of what is happening in the world today and what Nordcloud is dealing with is deeply interesting, varied and new. Services and features which were previously not feasible are now available for use, providing new solutions and possibilities. Combining these factors with leading the design and development in a practical way makes this a very exciting challenge.

Q3: Tell us a bit more about your background and journey to this point?

I first started working in digital design during the dotcom bubble when digital businesses were booming and many companies were investing heavily into building and creating the first web services. It may not have been the ‘healthiest’ start to my career in terms of a normal work life – it was a crazy time in many ways – but was super interesting and inspiring!

I would say I have had quite a logical path, every now and then changing roles, the approach, and point of view. I have always been keen to learn, and moved quite quickly from practical roles into more conceptual ones; what and why we are doing with a focus on user experience. I’ve worked at different consultancy companies, collecting experiences from different fields and organisations along the way.

At one stage I really wanted to focus on business fundamentals, so I took a slight sidetrack, running a business for 2 years, gaining a different perspective into the day to day running of a digital business, an experience which has really helped me to this day.

I jumped back into design and consultancy at a time where the whole design approach seemed to be broadening in the area of digital solution development. And now as the Head of Design at Nordcloud, I am operating in the intersection of strategic and UX design leading a team of designers within a fast-moving space.

Q4: What do you see as your most exciting challenge as Nordcloud’s new Design lead?

For me it’s that we’re only just starting to see the full potential and benefits of design within an IT context. Human-driven design and traditional IT used to be very far from each other, but now we start to see that gap finally closing in. And through that, we actually end up talking about larger transformation within organisations, than “just” IT infrastructure development. It’s a larger phenomena, where design has an essential role.

And even though this might sound visionary, our approach is very practical: We’re focusing on the human-aspect of processes and great user experience of digital services. We’re not selling design…well, for the sake of selling “design”. Design alone has no value, it needs to be utilised in a context – for example in new service innovations, digital process development or organisational transformation.

Design influences the way we feel, the decisions we make and the actions we take. In our case, we need to define what this means within a cloud native company. 

Q5: What should Nordcloud customers look out for over the next 12 months?

We are working closely with customers to have a more strategic level partnership, ensuring we can help clients throughout their cloud journey, being it about cloud driven transformation or new digital business creation. With design I think you see this embedded throughout these journeys and not just as an add-on at implementation.

Q6: What does the term ‘cloud native’ mean to you?

Cloud native can be interpreted differently by different people depending on the context. For me in design, cloud native means the tools and processes that allow us to embrace the cloud.

The immediate obvious elements relate to speed and utlisation of the most modern technologies. New tools make it possible to create things in a different way than they used to. With advances such as AI and machine learning we’re able to create totally new concepts, things which were not possible earlier. And even better yet, we get to implement these solution concepts fast, making them tangible and functional early on – and thus we get to deliver value to client organisations fast.

Q7: How do you see the IBM and Nordcloud philosophies working together?

From within the growing design team at Nordcloud, I see the acquisition with IBM as a “joining of forces.” Especially with resources and skills, there is a lot that can be shared. IBM has been working on combining cloud and design for some time already, so I’m eager to dive more into this and how we can work together.

Q8: How would you describe the characteristic ‘Jonna Iljin’ style?

I would say my signature style is positive, empowering, collaborative, systematic and process-driven. I tend to create processes to tackle a problem – everything is a process to me. 

My personal approach is that I strongly believe in people and their capabilities. There are a lot of great skills and abilities, often hidden within people, so I like to try to make that visible and to support that person to grow and develop. This benefits the organisation on many levels, from culture through to business performance.

Q9: What do you like doing outside of work?

Outside of work you can find me in the Alps, doing mountain sports. I have also climbed some of the “high mountains” – The Andes and The Himalayas.

Fun fact: I used to work as a mountain travel-leader while I was freelancing, and while it’s certainly different to design, in both fields I’ve always been keen to help people on that journey up the mountain. And to reach that summit, you gotta enjoy the process along the way!

Q10: How can people connect with you?

Connect with me on LinkedIn or send me a message.

Get in Touch

Let’s discuss how we can help with your cloud journey. Our experts are standing by to talk about your migration, modernisation, development and skills challenges.








    Starter for 10: Meet Magnus Manders, Nordcloud’s Head of Migration & Modernisation

    When people start working with Nordcloud, they generally comment on 2 things. First, how friendly and knowledgeable everyone is. Second, how fast Nordcloud is growing.

    This blog series gives you insight into both those elements – the great people and the supercharged growth. In this article, we talk to Magnus Manders, our new Head of Migration & Modernisation, about his first impressions as a Nordcloudian and the cloud-native future.

    Q1: First impressions, Magnus: what struck you about your first week at Nordcloud?

    The entrepreneurial spirit – there’s this sense that anything is possible. Decision making is really fast, which makes it a dynamic environment to work in. You really feel the momentum.

    Magnus Manders

    Q2: What made you decide to join Nordcloud?

    I was inspired by Nordcloud’s hypergrowth agenda and relish the opportunity to expand a team with the top cloud talent in the market.

    The second reason was Nordcloud’s cloud-native leadership. I joined Nordcloud from Nordea, where I was Group CTO. I had worked with Nordcloud and liked their laser focus on cloud native and public cloud. I think this is the future, and if you want to be pioneering in this area, Nordcloud is the place to be.

    Q3: So you came from Nordea. Tell us a bit more about your background.

    Nordea is the biggest Scandinavian bank, and as Group CTO I managed all the IT – from infrastructure to end-user services. This included driving the bank’s cloud agenda.

    Before that, I was at Capgemini for many years in various global roles. When I left, I was vice president leading the cloud transformation division. Prior to Capgemini, I was at Ikea running a large transforrmation programme and driving the global production unit.

    Q4: What do you see as your most exciting challenge as Nordcloud’s new Head of Migration & Modernisation?

    Attracting and retaining top talent. I want Nordcloud to be the hub for the best cloud migration and modernisation people in Europe. And I want to build on Nordcloud’s current Talent Acceleration Programme and development schemes to give the best opportunities for people to grow.

    Nordcloud has a strong skills base already, and the way we maintain our cloud leadership is by building on that. That way, no matter what migration or modernisation challenges customers have, we have the skills and the creativity to solve them.

    Q5: What should Nordcloud customers look out for over the next 12 months?

    I’m focused on helping customers accelerate their cloud journeys, and there are 2 elements to this.

    The first is around making it easier and faster for customers to exit their on-prem data centres. I want to ensure we’re in the strongest position to help customers overcome whatever barriers are preventing them from moving to the cloud – whether it’s resolving technical issues, developing a compelling business case or overcoming compliance issues.

    The second is about helping customers accelerate value from the cloud, which is where the modernisation piece comes in. The biggest growth area for companies is in modernisation, because that’s what opens the door to using cloud-native functionality, boosting agility, enabling faster time to market and increasing savings. Whatever monolithic applications you have, however tangled the code and no matter what the status of your documentation is – we’re the people who will make it easy and cost-effective to modernise. That way, the organisation gets more effective and can focus on managing the business instead of managing the infrastructure.

    Nordcloud’s Managed Cloud Migration and Managed Application Modernisation services are part of this. They remove barriers around capex, because you can migrate and modernise with zero upfront costs. They also ease the transition to operations because managed services considerations are integrated into the migration and modernisation process. In the next 12 months, customers can expect to see more creative approaches like this as we support their cloud journeys.

    Q6: What does the term ‘cloud native’ mean to you?

    We’re 100% cloud and only do migrations and modernisations to public cloud. This means we’re 100% focused on helping clients achieve cloud benefits. We don’t operate data centres, so there are no mixed loyalties or hidden agendas.

    Multi-cloud is the other aspect, because the future is definitely multi-cloud. Being cloud native means you’re in a position to leverage the best cloud capabilities, from the right hyperscaler at the right time. And that’s when you get true agility and can develop next-generation products and services.

    Q7: How do you see the IBM and Nordcloud philosophies working together?

    I come from an enterprise background, so to me, the Nordcloud/IBM combination gives customers access to a stronger partner. Nordcloud brings that dynamic, agile, cloud-native approach to migration and modernisation. And IBM brings the resources to help Nordcloud scale for large enterprise requirements.

    Q8: How would you describe the characteristic ‘Magnus Manders’ style?

    My style is about finding the right people, delegating and trusting them to get on with the job. I see my role as making sure people are working as a unified team to achieve common goals and overcome common challenges. It’s also about empowering people with responsibility, so they’re challenged and can grow and develop as individuals and leaders.

    Q9: What do you like doing outside of work?

    I’m an outdoorsy person and love anything that involves being in nature – whether it’s being in the forest or scuba diving.

    Q10: How can people connect with you?

    Connect with me on LinkedIn or send me a message.

    Get in Touch

    Let’s discuss how we can help with your cloud journey. Our experts are standing by to talk about your migration, modernisation, development and skills challenges.








      Starter for 10: Meet Florian Deter, Nordcloud’s new Chief Portfolio Officer

      When people start working with Nordcloud, they generally comment on 2 things. First, how friendly and knowledgeable everyone is. Second, how fast Nordcloud is growing. 

      This blog series gives you insight into both those elements – the great people and the supercharged growth. In this first article, we talk to Florian Deter, our new Chief Portfolio Officer, about his first impressions as a Nordcloudian and how he sees the company developing.

      Q1: First impressions, Florian: what struck you about your first week at Nordcloud?

      It’s a small thing, but the smooth onboarding process really struck me. When you speak to people at Nordcloud and read their literature, everyone talks about speed and automation. Take cloud migration, for example – Nordcloud does a TCO assessment in 2 weeks and a migration roadmap by week 4. There’s a clear emphasis on action rather than spending months or years doing analysis. 

      You can tell speed and an outcome focus are cultural things at Nordcloud because they extend to decision making and onboarding from an employee perspective. Processes (and platforms and tech) are set up to enable you to get on with the job.

      Q2: What made you decide to join Nordcloud?

      There are 2 elements to this. One, I’m a tech guy. When I did my Master’s in Engineering, my thesis was 50 pages of C++. But the thing I really love about tech is the way it involves problem-solving, whether that’s untangling an issue with code (at one end of the spectrum) or untangling a knotty business/growth problem (at the other end). In this regard, I felt a real affinity for everyone I spoke to at Nordcloud. They’re true cloud natives and builders born in the cloud. They love tech and are incisive about how people can use it to deliver value.

      The second reason is that I thrive on working in such hyper-growth environments. I love the pace, the high-calibre teams, the culture and how rewarding it is. When I read IBM had acquired Nordcloud, my first thought was: ‘How can I get involved?’

      Q3: So you came from IBM. Tell us a bit more about your background.

      My background is an interconnection of using tech and driving the business outcomes that come from using tech. After my Master’s during the dotcom boom, I joined PwC to work on large e-commerce projects. I wanted to be more technical, so I moved to Accenture, where I was on the development side as well as doing large-scale systems integration and managing distributed teams.

      I got a real taste for strategy and tech-driven business outcomes when I was doing my MBA in the US. That led to some 7 years as a Partner for strategy consultant Oliver Wyman and then to IBM, where I advised companies on the business opportunities of cloud (what it means for the organisation and how to execute a large-scale transformation programme linked to KPIs). Most recently at IBM, I was a Partner, DACH Head of IT Advisory and Service Line Leader for Cloud Applications. 

      Now, as Chief Portfolio Officer at Nordcloud, I’m looking at how a strategic product and service offering can really drive those measurable business outcomes.

      Q4: What do you see as your most exciting challenge as Nordcloud’s new Chief Portfolio Officer?

      I’m leading Nordcloud’s portfolio development, and that involves looking at the best way to harness Nordcloud’s cloud-native culture of speed, flexibility and innovation for large-scale transformation programmes. 

      Nordcloud has entered a hypergrowth stage now as an IBM company. It was already working with enterprise-level customers, but it’s now scaling to larger accounts within the IBM customer space – while retaining its agile heritage. This is a real differentiator for Nordcloud. Other enterprise-focused companies building a cloud-native practice in-house won’t have that inherent speed and culture.

      Q5: What should Nordcloud customers look out for over the next 12 months?

      My role is about scaling the portfolio to meet the needs of enterprise customers while protecting what makes us Nordcloud (obsession with tech, speed, flexibility, innovation, growth ambition and cloud-native leadership).

      A big part of meeting enterprise needs is winning hearts and minds beyond the tech space. That’s not just FinOps (which Nordcloud and Klarity are great at enabling) or linking cloud transformation to business KPIs. It’s also about linking in with the market community and partners, as well as looking at how we can help drive the customer’s wider growth and digitalisation agendas.

      Q6: What does the term ‘cloud native’ mean to you?

      You do hear the term ‘cloud native’ bandied around a lot, don’t you? And there are the obvious tech elements like serverless, microservices and containers. 

      But for me, the cultural element is key. It’s about ensuring companies have the culture to benefit from what is the greatest tech investment of all time. So fostering that innovation layer in the organisation, eventually empowering customers to benefit from of all that amazing hyperscaler tech that’s born in the cloud. 

      Q7: How do you see the IBM and Nordcloud philosophies working together?

      Nordcloud is an independent company that brings unique and complementary capabilities to IBM’s existing hybrid cloud focus. It’s the fast, nimble, cloud-native player in the big IBM universe. 

      Being independent is crucial, and working within the cloud space requires speed. ‘Migrate us in months.’ ‘Help me to accelerate this business function with cloud-native development.’ This is where Nordcloud shines – and enterprises have similar needs to smaller companies (even if the integrations, compliance and processes are more complex).

      Together, IBM and Nordcloud can support the customer wherever they are in their transformation journey – and wherever they want to end up.

      Q8: How would you describe the characteristic ‘Florian Deter’ style?

      I’m the guy that energises teams. I love ambition and challenge, and my aim is always to get people on board with that ambition to achieve amazing things – and then to celebrate success. 

      I’d say my style is about getting people excited about how great tech is and enabling them to develop their talent so they see what it can move in terms of business outcomes. But I do this in a thoughtful way that keeps people focused on the strategy, so energy is channelled into achieving the right outcomes.

      Q9: What do you like doing outside of work?

      I collect unusual certifications! I like doing courses and exams on niche subjects. At the moment, I’m a cheese conseiller, a Scottish whisky ambassador and a certified beer sommelier. Give me 7 beers and a blindfold, and I’ll point out the pilsner from the ale.

      Q10: How can people connect with you?

      Connect with me on LinkedIn or send me a message.

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        Nordcloud Achieves VMware Master Services Competency in VMware Cloud on AWS

        Nordcloud, the European leader in cloud services, today announced it has successfully achieved its VMware Cloud on AWS VMware Master Services Competency. This competency demonstrates that Nordcloud is committed to helping organizations accelerate their digital transformations by leveraging their validated services delivery capabilities around advanced VMware technologies.

        “Nordcloud has an established track record delivering fast, risk-free migrations to cloud with VMware,” said Ilja Summala, Chief Technology Officer, Nordcloud. “We’re proud to be at the vanguard of achieving this VMware Master Services Competency. This accomplishment demonstrates our commitment to helping organisations get quick wins with public cloud – while providing an effective foundation for long-term value.”

        “VMware is pleased to recognise Nordcloud for achieving its VMware Cloud on AWS Master Services Competency. This achievement shows customers that partners like Nordcloud are dedicated, invested and have validated expertise in advanced VMware technologies,” said Sandy Hogan, SVP of Worldwide Commercial and Partner Sales, VMware. “We value Nordcloud as a VMware partner, and appreciate their efforts in achieving this VMware distinction as they work to increase their service delivery capabilities.”

        VMware partners can achieve VMware Master Services Competencies in:

        • Cloud Management and Automation – Designates expertise in delivery of VMware Cloud Management and Automation solutions and services with deep understanding and execution of cloud management design principles and methodologies.
        • Data Center Virtualization – Designates expertise in delivery of VMware vSphere environments and digital infrastructure services with deep understanding of and execution in Data Center Virtualization design principles and methodologies.
        • Desktop and Mobility – Designates expertise in designing, installing, and maintaining VMware Workspace ONE and VMware Horizon solutions with deep understanding of and execution in desktop and mobility design principles and methodologies to deliver a scalable and reliable digital workspace.
        • Network Virtualization – Designates expertise in the delivery of VMware NSX environments and services with deployment and optimization of NSX environment capabilities.
        • VMware Cloud on AWS – Designates expertise in the delivery of hybrid cloud solutions based on VMware Cloud on AWS. This service provides an operationally consistent and familiar way to run, manage and secure applications in a hybrid IT environment.

        VMware Partner Connect empowers partners with flexibility to meet customers’ needs, making VMware technologies and services opportunities more accessible. Partners now have an enhanced experience that delivers simplicity, choice and innovation, and recognizes and rewards partners based on the value they bring to customers.

        Learn more about how your business can benefit from VMware Cloud on AWS with Nordcloud.

        About Nordcloud

        Nordcloud is a European leader in cloud implementation, application development, managed services and training. It’s a recognised cloud-native pioneer with a proven track record helping organisations leverage public cloud in a way that balances quick ins, immediate savings and sustainable value. As well as partnering with VMware, Nordcloud is triple-certified across Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform and Amazon Web Services – and is featured in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant. Nordcloud has 10 European hubs, over 500 employees and has delivered over 1,000 successful cloud projects for companies ranging from mid-size to large corporates.

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          Managing application incidents efficiently with alert instructions as code

          CATEGORIES

          Tech Community

          Authors: Henri Nieminen & Perttu Savolainen

          In this post we describe application incident management, and how we handle it at Nordcloud. We propose improvements to our current process, and evaluate those by implementing changes to our open-sourced tooling we use for managing alert configurations. We will showcase how to define alerts and alert instructions as code.

          Application Incident Management

          Incident management is a core feature of application maintenance, if something is going wrong in your application you would like to know about it. Incidents might vary from issues that slightly affect user experience to larger disruptions that could cause data loss.

          “Effective incident management is key to limiting the disruption caused by an incident and restoring normal business operations as quickly as possible.” (Google SRE, chapter 14)

          The best way to minimize the impact of disruptions in applications is to have a properly defined incident management process. The process should make sure that the correct people will get notified with the information required for quick evaluation of the severity of the issue.

          Incident management in Nordcloud Managed Cloud Applications

          Managed Cloud Applications (MCA) offers application management for cloud native applications. MCA takes the ownership of applications running in production and makes sure that they are and continue to be satisfactory to use. 

          The incident management process in MCA has been automated using third party services, internal tooling, and by using open-source software. The core of the process is application monitoring which defines when an alert should be raised from an application and what the severity of the issue might be.

          Alert Configuration

          Alert configuration defines:

          • what is being monitored,
          • when an alert should be triggered, and
          • what should happen when the given threshold is breached.


          Cloud providers allow you to provision resources using templating languages, which can be used to define alert configurations. The templating languages allow you to understand what kind of alert configuration has been deployed, and how it would change if you update it. The infrastructure can also be easily duplicated or recreated from scratch.

          For monitoring applications on AWS, we maintain two tools that we have open-sourced: AWS-cli  which is used to generate alert configuration based on the existing AWS resources, and mca-monitoring that is used to deploy the alerts. Alert definitions are maintained in a yaml file, which is easy to read and maintain. You can see an example of an AWS Lambda error alert definition in the image below (Figure 1).

          Figure 1: Example of alert configuration for AWS Lambda errors

          Application incident management instructions

          Incident management instructions are used to define possible initial steps to take when resolving a specific incident. Instructions should be easily readable and precise, so that anyone can quickly understand and execute the listed actions. The instructions are often located in the applications operative documentation, often referred as runbook, and maintained manually separate from the alert configuration. You can see an example of an alert description in a runbook below (Figure 2).

          Figure 2: Example of alert description with instructions

          The challenges in maintaining alert instructions

          Maintaining alert instructions in a quickly accessible location makes handling incidents faster and easier. However, when they are maintained manually separate from the actual alert configuration, managing them requires extra work to keep them aligned because you have to update them in multiple places.

          Whenever new alert definitions are added or old ones are updated, there is a risk that the instructions are not updated correctly to the runbook as it is an additional manual step. On top of this it is not always clear where to find the instructions, or their location could have changed, which may lead to unnecessary extra steps taken in order to find the correct up to date instructions.

          In the worst case scenario you might spend time looking for the instructions for an incident only to realize that the instructions for that type of incident have not been defined. Another issue we have noticed is that alert instructions might have different styling between runbooks, meaning that you might need to spend extra time interpreting each format or styling.

          Alert instructions as code

          There are multiple immediate benefits when defining alert instructions in the alert configuration:

          • Alerts should always be actionable: defining alert instructions forces you think about the actionability.
          • There are no extra steps required to find the alert instructions.
          • When the instructions are missing from the alert definition, it’s clear that they cannot be found elsewhere.
          • The instructions and alert configurations are in a single configuration, and the changes are applied by automated deployments.
          • The information is always up to date and matches the alert definition.

          Having alert descriptions and instructions in a machine readable format allows one to process them to almost any desired format. Automating this process would be an integral part of the solution. As one would store the alert configuration in a version control system, the added benefit would be a complete history of the alert instructions. These obvious benefits are similar to what you get by defining and documenting your API in the source code and generating the representations from the source.

          One downside with this approach is that whoever needs to manage the alert instructions, has to be familiar with the version control and document format. Inline editing in some of the version control platforms might help with editing the instructions, but still some users might be uncomfortable to edit a structured document they are not familiar with.

          Proof of concept

          What we want to achieve:

          • To have a document format that allows the user to define alert instructions.
          • mca-monitoring should be able to deploy those instructions to AWS.
          • AWS CloudWatch alerts should notify the correct people with the alert instructions.
          • Paging tool should display the instructions with the alert notification.

          To get started we need to define a suitable place in the alert configuration for the instructions, which requires only minimal changes to mca-monitoring.

          For the alert instructions in AWS CloudWatch, the alert description field works well. There is one restriction with this field as it has a length limitation of 1024 characters, which is plenty enough. Next we will show how to setup application monitoring on AWS using mca-cli and mca-monitoring, and how to include and test that the alert instructions also work.

          Setup the monitoring

          For generating initial alert configuration we will be using mca-cli which you can find on GitHub.

          To get started clone the repository and run link command, which will make mca-cli available globally:

          git clone git@github.com:nordcloud/mca-cli.git
          npm link

          To generate a monitoring setup with mca-cli, you will need to point to an AWS profile (find instructions from AWS docs on how to configure profiles). Mca-cli will generate baseline alerts configuration for the resources existing on the AWS account for all the services listed in the command. To generate alert configurations for all the Lambdas on the account defined for the profile exampleprofile with stage dev, run the following command:

          mca monitoring init --region eu-west-1 --profile exampleprofile --stage dev --output monitoring --service lambda

          This will create a monitoring directory that includes everything needed to define and deploy the monitoring resources. Mca-monitoring will be included as a dependency used to carry out the deployment.

          Configure the alerts and alert instructions

          Default alerts will be applied to all the resources defined in the configuration file, which can be extended or altered by defining resource specific alerts. Alerts are based on AWS CloudWatch metrics, each resource type has some default metrics but you can also create custom metrics.

          In the following example you can see how to define default alert instructions for Lambda Error metrics, these need to be defined in config.yml:

          custom:
            default:
              lambda:
                Errors:
                  enabled: true
                  autoResolve: false
                  alarm:
                    critical:
                      threshold: 1
                      evaluationPeriods: 1
                      alarmDescription: |
                        - Evaluate the criticality of alert:
                          * Check the amount of errors
                          * If there are a lot of errors inform the product owner immediately
                        - Find the requestId of the error with CloudWatch Insights query:
                          fields @timestamp, @message
                          | sort @timestamp desc
                          | filter @message like /ERROR/
                        - Get the logs for the requestId:
                          fields @timestamp, @message
                          | sort @timestamp desc
                          | filter @requestId = "requestIdHere"
                        - Check if a development ticket exists of this issue
                          * If not create one

          Deploy the monitoring

          Run the following commands to install the dependencies, set up the resources for AWS CDK deployment, and deploy the monitoring:

          npm install
          npm run bootstrap
          npm run deploy

          To verify that the alerts were properly deployed you can check them with AWS cli:

          aws cloudwatch describe-alarms --profile exampleprofile  --region eu-west-1

          After deploying you can see the description of the alert in CloudWatch Console. As you can see the line breaks don’t show correctly in there (Figure 3).

          Figure 3: Alert description in AWS CloudWatch

          Test the alert escalation

          Testing alert escalation can be done by triggering them with AWS cli:

          aws cloudwatch set-alarm-state --profile exampleprofile --alarm-name "example-alarm-name" --state-value ALARM --state-reason "Alert escalation test"


          The command sets the alarm state manually to a selected value, which in this case triggers the Cloud Watch Alert. The triggered alert is connected to the paging system which displays the alert like this, with the defined instructions (Figure 4):

          Figure 4: Alerts instructions in the paging system

          Conclusion

          We have shown our current process of managing alert instructions in the operational documentation of applications, and implemented an improvement in the form of a proof of concept. Initial observations indicate that the practice of handling alert instructions with the alert configuration would be a small change in the implementation but a huge improvement for the process of incident management. This concept would improve the following parts of our incident management process:

          • accessibility of alert instructions would skyrocket, 
          • it would be easier to keep alert instructions up to date and matching with the alert configuration, and
          • alert actionability would be perfected.

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            Defining Our Employee Promise

            In the warm and sunny spring of 2020, the core team of three, consisting of two people from Finland and one from Poland, decided to sit down and work together on our Employee Promise for our candidates and employees. They had a nice chance for this since everyone was locked down in their homes due to pandemic and it was a good time to concentrate on big questions like this…

            What’s an Employee Promise, actually?

            Reeta:

            Employee Promise (also known as Employee Value Proposition) is a set of offerings which an employer provides for its employees in return for the skills, capabilities and experiences they bring to the organization (simplified version based on the definition from Brett Minchington). 

            Simply put, it defines what employees and candidates can expect from an organization. Our promise for our employees and candidates can’t be something coming out of the heads of our People Operations team but it needs to be based on research. That’s why we made some deep analysis about how our employees experience working at Nordcloud.

            In the end Employee Promise leads our people operations strategy and community building. From a candidate perspective it ensures we describe what Nordcloud truly is instead of just providing a list of nice-sounding buzzwords.

            Wlad:

            To me it’s very simple. It’s a genuine and honest answer to a question: What kind of working environment can I expect at Nordcloud if I join your team? Just pure truth, no sugar coating but also focusing on where we succeed and what we do well. And I think there’s a couple of things that we can be proud of, as our research has proved us.

            Katia:

            Following exactly the thoughts from Wlad, for me the employee promise is simply an answer to the famous question ‘why’. So it’s the reason for our current and possible future employees to work for Nordcloud. What’s in it for me? What can I expect to get, and to give in return? 

            In addition, I think the Employee Promise should be three things: it should be concrete and sustainable so that it will manifest itself in everyday life and endure time. And as Wlad pointed out, it should also be real and true, so that if not everyone but at least the majority of our people can relate to it, nod in approval and endorse it. On top of that, it should at least to some extent distinguish us from others so that candidates find it attractive and our own people can be proud of being part of the team at Nordcloud.

            Alright, now we’re really looking to learn about the Employee Promise at Nordcloud.

            Everyone:

            We’re excited to introduce it to you! Here we go:

            Now let’s have a closer look at what this really means. Here are the four different building blocks or elements in order to drill down a bit deeper into what the employee promise is all about:

            Can you elaborate a bit more on that?

            Katia:

            For me the digital builders and transforming the industry parts are sort of quite self-explanatory in the sense that it’s our purpose: this is why we exist and this is how we do it. We build solutions with the latest tech and help our customers – and as a result the whole world – to utilize cloud and modern technologies for transforming the ways of working. I feel these are strongly linked to two of our core values ‘We win together’ and ‘We make a difference’. Of course it’s also about our vision of empowering people to prosper in an automated world and become the world’s largest enabler of computing. Our mission is to power-up our customers digital success by building on the world’s best technology platforms.

            As for the adaptability part it probably would need a bit more concrete examples, since as we also discovered during our investigations, flexibility can mean quite a lot of different things for different people. In our line of business it usually refers to e.g. flexible working hours, remote work, flat organization structure and so on, which are probably more of a standard in IT companies these days.

            But for us it can also mean being adaptable in terms of ways of working, role descriptions and responsibilities, career development or decision making. This would include for example using agile methodologies, promoting project rotation, making decisions in autonomous teams and not being too stuck with job titles or territories and organizational silos. In essence, ‘We work smart’.

            In our community I think the most visible aspect is the strong culture of learning and sharing knowledge, which is beyond anything I’ve seen before. Since we are working from 10 European countries, it’s not a surprise that the atmosphere we have is international and probably many other companies also have a friendly and easily approachable feel to it, but the fact that self-development and knowledge sharing is so strongly promoted is for me unparalleled.

            There are always highly skilled experts around to ask for help and to learn. Not to mention some of the most hilarious facepalming moments I’ve had following our #random channel in Slack 🙂 so all in all, I would say that definitely ‘We grow together’.

            How did the process of creating and crystallising Nordcloud’s Employee Promise look like?

            Wlad:

            Wow, that was a hell of a journey! Like with every big project, the preparation process took some time because we really wanted to make sure that the outcome is supported by data. We analyzed numerous surveys and researched what we have done at the company over the last 2 years involving the topics around people’s satisfaction, candidate brand, company’s brand etc.

            And very soon it proved to be the right way as the results really surprised us.

            I think what the marketing team created for the B2B goals has also been hugely helpful for us as it gave us a sense of direction (and it was great to see that our messaging has quite a lot in common with each other).

            We also asked our tech leaders for opinions once the concept was drafted. The discussion took over 2 hours instead of one so you may imagine how intriguing it was. We received some invaluable feedback that allowed us to polish the message to the shape which we have presented as an outcome.

            What did you learn during the process?

            Wlad:

            Well, I could mention a lot of things but I will mention the three most important to me personally. First of all, I had no experience with Employee Promise evaluation before so I had to climb really high on the learning curve in the beginning. I’ve always been passionate about Employer Branding topics but I never had a chance to be involved in building something from the scratch in this domain.

            Second of all, it really made me realize how important it is to use data properly and trust it, rather than your gut feeling. I will say something that might seem a bit controversial: if you’re new to something, don’t trust your intuition – you could as well flip a coin and it would be the same. Trust data and research instead.

            For example, we all thought in the beginning that every IT company on the market is very adaptable. But then we conducted a Nordcloud Community Survey which was filled out by 181 people and it turned out that 131 admitted to the statement that we have flexible ways of working! That’s more than 76%! You should’ve seen our faces when we realized it!

            Last but not least: we really enjoyed working together and found that we have a lot in common. I know I have colleagues that I can fully trust (it’s worth mentioning that I have never met Katia in person and with Reeta we have only met f2f once). Also, I think Poles and Finns have more in common than anyone would suspect.

            Katia:

            Well, I could make this really easy and say “what Wlad said” since I fully agree with everything above. I think all of us in the project team have our own strengths or ‘superpowers’ if you like which we could utilize and which supplemented each other really nicely.

            Among many other things, Wlad is really great with data research, Reeta has powerful insights coming from the long experience in our company and culture, and I had some experience in working with Employee Promise and Employee Value Proposition from before in my previous career. 

            To me it was a perfect showcase of collective intelligence and teamwork resulting in more than the sum of its parts. I really enjoyed our brainstorming and collaboration, and also learned a lot about agile tools and ways of working. Let alone the fact that I think it brought us a lot closer to each other, getting to know each other not just as colleagues but on a personal level. And above all, we had great fun working together!

            Reeta:

            Do you have an hour to listen? 😀 We learnt so much! First of all, for me the building process was a great example of how a team can be greater than the sum of its parts. By working together we came to the conclusions which would have never been found if everyone was going through the thinking process alone.

            It’s amazing when in the right flow, the team is deepening the analysis, completing each other’s sentences and always taking a step forward to a new direction you never expected – but can’t stop admiring once it’s in front of you. I am proud to have such inspiring and passionate colleagues who I can look up to. 

            In our way of thinking, community development has to be community-driven and the same applies to this process. Without great insights and involvement from the Nordcloud community it is not possible to put the main elements of Nordcloud together.

            Another remark I made was that one should never take something as self-evident. We almost dropped away one key part of our Employee Promise because we thought it’s not differentiating us from other tech companies at all: adaptability and flexibility. We thought it would be one of the hygiene factors, i.e. something which almost every organisation in the domain implements.

            After digging deeper into data we noticed that it was us who thought all the other tech companies must be flexible, not our community who has the most experience from different tech companies. We understood it was actually one of our strengths and we were just so used to having flexible ways of working at Nordcloud that we thought it wouldn’t be important or make a difference. But it does.

            Actually, now that I think of it, how we followed agile methodologies in this process is a great example of how flexibility is built-in at Nordcloud. Agile methodologies are all about experimenting and continuous improvement, and that describes also the Nordcloud spirit very well.

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              Microsoft awards Nordcloud Partner of the year for 2020

              Nordcloud has been awarded the 2020 Microsoft Country Partner of the Year Award for Finland. The awards recognises partners that have demonstrated leading expertise and delivery for Microsoft cloud solutions across a range of key customers over the past 12 months.

              The award is further recognition for Nordcloud as the leading cloud native provider in the market, combining highly technical resources in a truly agile way of working. This approach is proving valuable for customers seeking the pace and agility needed for successful cloud adoption.

              “We chose Nordcloud as our Partner of the Year for the second year in a row thanks to their meritorious and strong cloud technology work.” Says Katarina Engblom, Microsoft’s Oy’s Director for Partners.

              “Nordcloud makes extensive use of our Azure cloud technology for the benefit of our common customers, and our cooperation has been further strengthened over the past year. Nordcloud’s strength also lies in the continuous development of new cloud-based services. They truly set a benchmark for all partners in the way they are able to continue growing their cloud service business with their ambitious goals and they are leading the way in supporting customers’ digitalization,” continues Engblom.

              “We are accelerating our customers’ digital transformation by supporting a secure and fast cloud journey to Azure. As Microsoft’s partner of the year, we are focussed on constantly developing our leading automated services to be compatible with Microsoft’s Azure Cloud Adoption Framework (CAF). This is driving even greater value to our customers.” Says Jan Kritz, CEO of Nordcloud.

              How can your business benefit from the Nordcloud Azure partnership? Click here to find out more. 


              Nordcloud is recognised as the leading cloud-native Managed Services Provider that with over 1000 successful deployments has a proven track record enabling organisations to achieve their digital ambitions by leveraging the power of the public cloud. Nordcloud has 10 hubs in Europe, over 500 employees and has delivered over 1000 successful cloud projects to date. Nordcloud powers organisations from mid-sized to large corporates.


              Learn more at https://nordcloud.com/

              Why did Microsoft award Nordcloud Partner of the Year?

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                What it’s like to be a new hire during Covid-19

                We all have been there before, the thrill of getting that call when your future manager makes the offer. You are so excited, counting the days when you will finally get to meet your new colleagues in person, get familiarized with the new office culture and perhaps even find a few new local favorite lunch spots.

                None of that became a reality for me when I joined Nordcloud in the middle of the COVID-19 outbreak.

                My name is Marta Clements and I thought I would share with you my story of what it has been like to be a new hire at Norcloud in these very unusual and challenging times.

                Where are you from and how did you end up in Nordcloud?

                I was born and raised in Barcelona with an American mother and a Spanish father. From an early age I was exposed to a very international upbringing so it is not surprising that I followed my parents footsteps wanting to experience different cultures. One opportunity led to the next and fast forward a few countries, a few jobs, a husband and a 6 year old son, here I am in Stockholm working as a Talent Acquisition Partner for a Finnish company.

                My decision to join Nordcloud was super easy. Who wouldn’t want to join a super talented and diverse group of people working on cutting edge technology in a true collaborative spirit?

                What is your core competence? Please tell us about your role.

                I joined the Talent Acquisition team and as the role suggests my core competence is identifying the best talent to support the growth of the business. What I like the most about my role is that it doesn’t matter how many interviews I’ve conducted or been part of, I am yet to find two identical interviews.

                Coming from a previous commercial background, I also get a kick when an offer has been made and a candidate says yes. It’s exciting to think one can have a positive impact in somebody’s life and equally find people that have a positive impact on the business and help us grow.

                What has it been like to join Nordcloud during Covid -19?

                Remote working has a new meaning for all of us now, but even more so when your first week in your new job also becomes remote. So much has happened in this last month but when I joined Nordcloud it was still early days of the virus outbreak in Sweden. 

                Prior to joining I had received a very comprehensive welcome pack with all the information I needed during my first weeks. Included there was also a section explaining Nordcloud’s Covid-19 policy which urged all employees to work from home.

                My new laptop was being delivered to the office, so one could say that my first day was still relatively normal as I got to meet two colleagues in person. In fact they are still the only colleagues I have physically met and it’s been almost a month! As the laptop delivery was experiencing delays, I also got to lock up the office and set the alarm on my first day. Now that’s what I call trusting your employees! Not bad at all, I told myself. I’m going to be doing just fine. 

                The original plan for my induction at Nordcloud would have been categorized as a dream for any new hire: My line manager from Finland together with one of my colleagues from the Polish office were going to fly to Stockholm and help me get acclimatized to Nordcloud during my first week. Unfortunately that warm welcome never took place in person, but it’s amazing how fast we have adapted to our new reality and made the most of video conferencing. Who is to say that one cannot get to know your colleagues this way?

                What has it been like to follow Nordcloud’s induction program remotely?

                At Nordcloud it is common practice to group new hires together and have them start on the same day every month. This means we have people joining from very different backgrounds across the various European office locations. As such, the general induction sessions are usually conducted remotely and you can immediately sense that Nordcloud has a good grasp of it. The sessions are so well organized and prepared. During these sessions you also get to meet some of the leadership such as our CEO Jan Kritz, who goes over “Nordcloud in a nutshell”. Even though we were all remote, Jan still urged every single one of us to introduce ourselves to the group. He also made a point of switching on our cameras to make it more personal.

                In addition to the group induction program, my team had also put together an induction plan relevant to my role. My entire first 3 weeks had been planned and thought through. They even had put together a presentation to outline the plan! That’s when you realize how much energy and effort they have put together to make you feel welcome and most importantly to help you be successful.

                Remote or not, I can’t imagine how one can feel more welcomed.

                What can you share about Nordcloud’s culture so far?

                Prior to Covid-19, if you had asked me if one could grasp a company’s culture through videoconferencing and remote working, I would have probably been inclined to say that you couldn’t.

                To my surprise: You absolutely can! As I mentioned earlier, I have only physically met two Nordcloudians and yet I feel as if I have a good understanding of the Nordcloud culture.

                If I had to summarize it in 3 words I would say: Collaborative, transparent and positive problem solvers.

                Yet there is so much more to the culture than that, but hopefully you will discover it yourself one day.

                Remote coffee breaks definitely take the prize. I have never been invited to so many remote coffee breaks. If I wanted to I could attend a coffee break every day.  We even have an app that matches your availability with 3 other random colleagues across Europe and you get to have a remote break together. What a fantastic way to get to meet new people while keeping some mental sanity during these Covid-19 times.

                What is the most useful thing you have learned at Nordcloud?

                Having grown up in Spain, I’m always amazed how organized and structured conversations can be when you are engaging with Nordic people.

                In Spain we usually interrupt each other and somehow the conversations have a different tempo. I was pleasantly surprised how friendly and chatty my team members are. But one thing is clear to me, there is no interrupting here!

                This skill is even more necessary when dealing with video conferencing.

                What do you do outside of work?

                When we moved to Stockholm from London I wanted to experience the best that Sweden has to offer. To me that meant living in the suburbs close to nature but also close to the city. I can’t imagine a more ideal upbringing when you have a young family. Near our home there is a fantastic bike path surrounded by the beautiful landscape of the sea. We love going there together as a family and having a picnic. I can now officially say that my 6 year old is faster than me on the bike.

                I look forward to meeting my colleagues soon!

                Interested in joining Nordcloud? Have a look at our open positions and get in touch!

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                  A Recruiter’s Perspective on Remote Work

                  In the times of the Coronavirus you can read a lot about ways of switching to the remote ways of working. At Nordcloud we have this in our DNA. However, this article is about something slightly different, although there are some general guidelines here.

                  Here is the story from Wladyslaw who started supporting recruitment in Scandinavia fully remotely… from our office in Poznań, Poland.

                  When I came to Nordcloud a year ago, I took on the challenge of supporting recruitment in Scandinavia. Back then, I already had a couple years of experience working as a recruiter and sourcer. Before that, I also worked as an Executive Assistant in two consulting companies, where I remotely supported managers and partners from German-speaking countries.

                  Needless to say, I felt quite ready for this. Everything seemed quite familiar to me. I knew how to work with remote colleagues, I was really into agile ways of working and I also had a plan in my head on how to do it. I have also been very interested in this region, since I studied Scandinavian politics & culture during my studies.

                  Now, after one year, I must admit that I had to revise a lot of my assumptions about remote recruitment. Was it challenging? Sometimes yes. Was it worth taking on this challenge? Definitely yes!

                  The current situation is forcing us to rethink our ways of working in many industries. Working as a remote recruiter in the IT industry is probably easier, because people you work with are a bit more used to it. I can imagine that it’s not always easy. People really appreciate personal contact a lot and it’s much easier to give a good impression if you meet someone face-to-face.

                  However, it’s not impossible. You can still do it successfully. The most important thing one needs to take into consideration is not to take anything for granted. When you meet someone in the conference room or in the lobby, interaction starts in a natural way. How many times have you been reminded of telling something important to your colleague when you met them in the kitchen? In a virtual world you need to create those situations proactively. 

                  So, what are the key takeaways from this past year? I would mention 4 of them.

                  1. Building good relationships with the people

                  Considering a bigger picture, I think that the cornerstone of every effective remote cooperation is building good collaboration with your working peers. It is of course harder to do it when you don’t meet these people every day in the office, but it’s not impossible. I think that an important source of inspiration for me was the fact that I immediately started to work in a recruitment team that was already spread between many locations. Some of my colleagues that I closely cooperate with work in Helsinki, London & Stockholm. When I was in doubt, I could reflect on how great we can work together.

                  The biggest challenge with working in such a setup is that it seems counterintuitive. There’s no doubt about the fact that people are social animals – we like to interact with each other and we enjoy personal contact. Therefore, you need to make this as close to the real situation as possible. You need to set up regular catch-ups, ideally with video connections. 

                  However, it’s not always possible. You might be afraid of using instant messaging (like Slack, Teams etc.) but sometimes this is the only way of doing it. As much as recruitment is important for hiring managers, tech recruiters and other colleagues, you also need to remember that they often have a lot of other stuff to do. Your priorities are not their priorities. And this is normal. Accept it and carry on. Which leads us to the second point, which is…

                  1. Persistence is the key!

                  You would probably agree on how annoying it seems when your partner or friend doesn’t want to respond to this super important message you sent them 20 minutes ago. You check your WhatsApp, SMS, Messenger or whatever and nothing is there. The same goes for your virtual workplace. How many times have you had an ideal candidate with two other offers on the table, but your business partners are away in client workshops and it’s super hard to get hold of them? 

                  Be clear about your goals. And remember that people expect you to be responsible for delivering them. As cruel as it sounds, no one will care that it was too hard to reach someone in charge of decision-making. It’s you who needs to push through. Even if you don’t see it now, this is how you build a strong credibility in front of your remote colleagues, peers and hiring managers. It will pay off one day. Trust me.

                  1. Remembering that this is just a substitute of a personal contact

                  Let’s admit it – nothing will replace eye-2-eye contact. I know it sounds brutal and for some it can even be contradictory to what I just wrote. But I also believe that staying as true to reality as possible can help you avoid a lot of disappointment. This is how the world today works and the sooner you adapt to it the better for you. It’s irrelevant whether you perceive it as something positive or negative. This is a reality coming true. According to Forbes.com 50% of the U.S. workforce will soon be remote. The same will happen in other countries in the coming decades.

                  The current worldwide coronavirus crisis can even accelerate that, now that many companies have realized in practice how it works, and their legacy culture is not impeding it. 

                  This is a great opportunity for you to be ready when the future knocks on your door!

                  However, it really helps a lot if you can meet your colleagues in person once in a while. How often would it need to be? It’s really a very individual thing, but from my experience I would say that meeting at least once a year is essential.

                  Does it mean that if you have never met your colleagues, you will never build a successful and effective team? Of course not, it is totally possible! Then you just need to make this extra effort to make it work, but trust me, it’s really worth it! There are companies that already operate fully remotely. I think that the most famous one currently is Buffer, a company that has created a software application designed to manage accounts in social networks. But how to plan it in the most effective way? This leads me to the last point…

                  1. Try agile!

                  Agile is a great idea that was created in the beginning of the century to improve the quality and delivery of software products. I’m pretty sure you’ve heard about it already, since it has also become very popular outside of the IT realm nowadays. Although agile offers some concrete tools or methodologies to use (SCRUM being the most famous one), it’s not about the tools you use but how you approach daily work. This is an amazing way of working in remote teams, because it forces you to think how you can work smarter every day. At Nordcloud we started implementing agile in HR by working in SCRUM. We also use tools like Trello and Slack to make our daily communication more effective. If you are an HR person looking for more specific guidelines, I recommend you visit an Agile HR Manifesto website, which was compiled by a team lead by Pia-Maria Thoren. 

                  To sum up

                  Remote work is constantly gaining on popularity and it will do so even more in the future. If you work as an HR person, you may have already come across this way of working. It may be even so that your employer allows you to work from home once a week. Maybe you have this business partner, hiring manager etc. that you struggle to work effectively with. 

                  Regardless of where you are now and what you do, this will become an even bigger part of your reality much sooner than you think. I hope you find some thoughts in this article useful on your path to success in this rapidly changing world. 

                  Interested in joining Nordcloud? Have a look at our open positions and get in touch!

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                    Nordcloud positioned in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Public Cloud Infrastructure Professional and Managed Services, Worldwide

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                    Nordcloud positioned in Gartner´s Magic Quadrant for Public Cloud Infrastructure Professional and Managed Services, Worldwide

                    This Is The Third Year In A Row Nordcloud Has Been Included In This Report

                    2019 Magic Quadrant for Public Cloud Infrastructure, Professional and Managed Services, Worldwide report evaluated 19 different vendors.

                    Nordcloud achieves highest placement for its ability to execute in the Niche Players’ quadrant.

                    According to Gartner, “this Magic Quadrant is focused on MSPs that have deep technical expertise with hyperscale providers, effective cloud management platforms (CMPs), and managed services that leverage automation, where possible. The MSPs must also possess the ability to deliver cloud-optimized solutions, regardless of whether a customer is deploying new cloud-native applications or migrating legacy workloads from an existing traditional data center. This depth of expertise and technical integration, including exploiting the API-enabled automation of hyperscale providers, distinguishes these MSPs from data center outsourcing (DCO) providers. Traditional DCO providers usually offer solutions that largely treat hyperscale providers as if they were simply virtualization platforms.”

                    According to Gartner, “by 2024, more than 50% of cloud service deals will include both application development services and cloud infrastructure professional and managed services, up from 10% in 2019.”

                    “We believe Nordcloud has landed in the Magic Quadrant for a third year in a row because we combine cloud infrastructure and cloud application development in order to provide full-service cloud transformations to our customers. This is expected to be a key feature in the majority of deals within the next five years” says Jan Kritz, CEO, Nordcloud.

                    “Our hyperscale focused MSP strategy and European market focus ensures our customers get local access to the capabilities to drive success on their digital transformation while reducing IT costs.”

                    Nordcloud Recognized Also By Financial Times

                    The Magic Quadrant recognition is the latest acknowledgement Nordcloud has received. Previously, The Financial Times positioned Nordcloud in their 1000 fastest growing companies in Europe (FT1000) listing in March 2019.

                    Nordcloud is a rare company worldwide to have audited partner certifications with all three leading hyperscalers: Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud and Microsoft Azure. Nordcloud operates in 10 European countries and employs over 420 cloud experts.

                    About Gartner

                    Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

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